MEETING THE UNIQUE NEEDS New skills in resilience for the teenagers of our military families facing deployment, reintegration, and family dynamics of warriors with mental & physical wounds


The Challenge:

Almost two million children in the United States have at least one parent serving in the military. The number of these families who are currently, or have previously, experienced the strain of wartime deployments, and subsequently the reintegration process, has grown tremendously in the past decade. The recent study Coming Home: The Experiences and Implications of Reintegration by Lydia I. Marek, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Department of Human Development, Virginia Tech, looks at the factors affecting the resilience of military families and their ability to cope with the deployment and reintegration cycle. The effects on adolescents include the following
  1. 23% reported moderate to serious/very serious problems coping with day to day stresses and problem during their parentís deployment
  2. 15% reported some level of difficulty getting along with their deployed parent
  3. 21% reported moderate to serious/very serious problems coping with day to day stresses and problem during their parentís reintegration
  4. 26% reported moderate to serious/very serious problems coping with the demands the military made of family members
  5. Coping with day to day stressors was more problematic during deployment than during reintegration.


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